[KB] Questions for discussion at my panel

Edward C Appel edwardcappel at frontier.com
Fri Jun 23 19:57:23 EDT 2017


Good point, Bob, on the "top 1 percent" as modification of the general thesis that Edsall and the political scientists he's building his case on advance. If we say that, in general, numbers of perons with good middle-class and above incomes gravitate to the left via the "higher education" and "higher income" standards on the scale of conservative to liberal---that makes more sense than going by average income itself. More of the very top earners are surely still in league with the parties of the right.

Whose hide, after all,  is being rescued by the Republican House and Senate healthcare bills now in play? Not "rescued," actually, but grossly overindulged?



Ed  
--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 6/23/17,  <wessr at oregonstate.edu> wrote:

 Subject: Re: [KB] Questions for discussion at my panel
 To: "Edward C Appel" <edwardcappel at frontier.com>
 Cc: "kb at kbjournal.org" <kb at kbjournal.org>, "CarrolCox" <cbcox at ilstu.edu>
 Date: Friday, June 23, 2017, 2:02 PM
 
 I agree with Ed that Burke's "Destiny
 of Acceptance Frames" provides  
 the
 broad standpoint needed to consider current shifts.
 
 I would formulate these shifts
 somewhat differently, however, mainly  
 more broadly.
 
 Consider that in the 1700s and 1800s,
 democratic culture helped  
 capitalism
 defeat the aristocracy economically, politically, and  
 finally culturally. Remnants of the aristocracy
 remain (e.g., UK's  
 monarchy), but in
 the 1900s the defeat of the aristocracy was completed.
 
 But in the 1900s, democratic
 culture started legalizing unions and  
 passing laws restraining capitalism. Democratic
 culture began to  
 become a problem rather
 than a solution for capitalist expansion.
 
 Today, authoritarian culture
 may be more useful to capitalist  
 expansion than democratic culture (China?).
 Perhaps the rise is  
 quicker in the US
 than in Europe. Maybe, more hopefully, having seen  
 the rise in the US, Europe may be reacting
 against it.
 
 Education, as
 Ed suggests, may be especially important insofar as  
 different levels of education may track
 different responses to  
 authoritarianism.
 Education does correlate with income, but when you  
 get to the top 1% you're dealing with a
 difference that makes a  
 difference
 ("dark money").
 
 Such shifts take time to play out but
 Burke's acceptance/rejection  
 does
 provide a standpoint from which to track what is
 happening.
 
 Bob
 
 Quoting Edward C Appel <edwardcappel at frontier.com>:
 
 > Burkophiles,
 >
 > At the risk of being
 reprimanded again for injecting current  
 > politics into our sacrosanct parlor
 discussion, allow me to respond  
 > to
 Carrol’s response to Herb’s conference panel
 question.
 >
 > Many
 factors account for Clinton’s “loss” to Trump in 2016.
 I put  
 > “loss” in quotation marks
 because, if the U.S. were actually a  
 >
 democracy, Clinton would have won by almost three million
 votes.  
 > Everything’s gerrymandered
 to beat the band, including our outdated  
 > Electoral College. You can read the
 chapter “Program” in CS as a  
 >
 paean to democracy as a discursive necessity.
 >
 > But let’s get to
 the most intriguingly proleptic Burkean commentary  
 > on 2016, “The Destiny of Acceptance
 Frames” in ATH. Trump’s  
 >
 irregular burlesque-cum-factionally tragic campaign
 discourse  
 > (that’s how I see it)
 went with, and signaled, the frame-breaking we  
 > surely must note in the altered voting
 patterns in rustbelt states  
 > like
 Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania. A must-read essay
 on  
 > this potentially tectonic shift
 appeared in yesterday’s NYTimes:  
 >
 “The End of the Left and the Right as We Knew Them,” by
 Thomas  
 > Edsall. The frame-breaking is
 occurring across the Western world,  
 >
 most notably in recent elections in the U.K. (June 8),
 France, the  
 > Netherlands, and
 Austria.
 >
 > Across
 the board, the new and most prominent demographic
 indicators  
 > of left vs. right are
 education and income: Those with college and  
 > advanced degrees go left; with high school
 or less, they go right.  
 > The same
 with income: Kensington in London, the richest voting  
 > district in the UK, went Labour on June 8
 for the first time ever.  
 > The
 formerly class-based politics is being replaced by  
 > culture-based. Labor/social-democratic
 parties lost ground  
 > precipitously in
 all recent European elections, except in England.  
 > And there, it was enhanced Labour
 Party-voting in Conservative  
 >
 districts that inflated their vote total. Now, it’s “a
 more racially  
 > and zenophobic
 politics, on the one hand, and a politics  
 > capitalizing on increasing levels of
 education and open-mindedness  
 > in the
 electorate, on the other.”
 >
 > The upshot, as Edsall seems to see it,
 translated into Burkean  
 > terms:
 Don’t expect too much from the symbolic species. What is 
 
 > required of the left is “some
 thoughtful and humane co-optation in  
 >
 the form of deference to our limits and boundaries.”
 >
 > Reckoning by their
 pieties and allegiances, how much accelerating  
 > “diversity” and social marginalization
 can the working class,  
 > already beset
 by economic globalization, absorb?
 >
 > Ed
 >
 >
 --------------------------------------------
 > On Wed, 6/21/17, Cox, Carrol <cbcox at ilstu.edu>
 wrote:
 >
 >  Subject:
 Re: [KB] Questions for discussion at my panel
 >  To: "kb at kbjournal.org"
 <kb at kbjournal.org>
 >  Date: Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 9:23
 PM
 >
 >  The black
 voters of Philadelphia
 >  stayed home on
 election day, and that gave Pennsylvania
 >  & the election to Trump.
 >
 >  Actually, the 2016
 election was decided by what
 >  Obama
 did and (more importantly ) did not do in the first
 >  two years of his presidency.
 >
 >  Carrol
 >
 >  -----Original
 Message-----
 >  From: KB [mailto:kb-bounces at kbjournal.org]
 >  On Behalf Of Edward C Appel
 >  Sent: Monday,
 > 
 June 05, 2017 10:05 AM
 >  To: Edward C
 Appel;
 >  HERBERT W. Simons
 >  Cc: gayle simons; kb at kbjournal.org;
 >  Cem Zeytinoglu
 > 
 Subject: Re: [KB] Questions
 >  for
 discussion at my panel
 >
 >  Great questions, Herb! Thanks a bunch.
 Looking
 >  forward to our panel.
 >
 >
 >
 >  Ed
 > 
 --------------------------------------------
 >  On Mon, 6/5/17, HERBERT W. Simons <hsimons at temple.edu>
 >  wrote:
 >
 >   Subject: Questions
 >  for discussion at my panel
 >   To: "Edward
 > 
 C Appel" <edwardcappel at frontier.com>
 >   Cc: "Cem Zeytinoglu" <czeytinogl at po-box.esu.edu>,
 >  "David Blakesley" <dblakes at clemson.edu>,
 >  "gayle simons" <gaylesimons at yahoo.com>,
 >  kb at kbjournal.org,
 >  "David C. Williams" <dcwill at fau.edu>
 >   Date: Monday, June 5, 2017, 9:48 AM
 >
 >   KB CONFERENCE
 Session on
 >   TRUMP Herb Simons
 >
 >   1.   
 >   What does discourse
 >  about Trump in the media
 >   tell us about who
 >  “we” are? Who “they” are? i.e.
 our
 >
 >  beliefs and
 values;
 >
 >
 >  2.   
 >   What
 roles are played by money and
 >  power:
 e.g.,
 >   in the GOP on issues like
 >  climate control?
 >
 >
 >  3.   
 >   Assess U,S. news media re Trump,
 >  including SMS,
 >  
 Cable, social media, radio.
 >  How did
 GOP achieve control? Was
 >   Edelman
 >  right on
 >   media?:
 a passing parade of
 >  symbols? Ritual
 elements?
 >   Theater? Dramatic
 >  in
 >   outline;
 empty of detail?
 >
 > 
  4.   
 >
 > 
 Investigative journalism: liberal? Unbalanced?
 >   Immature? Praiseworthy
 >
 >   5.   
 >   Is there a deep
 > 
 state in the U.S.? A media elite?
 >  
 Intel
 >  CIA, academies?? 
 FBI,infotainment?
 >   Role
 >  of old money?Do we amuse ourselves to
 death?
 >   (Postman)
 >
 >
 >  6.   
 >   RE
 explaining Trump what’s Rhet
 > 
 theory/crit’s
 >   distinctive 
 >  contribution
 >
 >   a.   
 >  
 Mercieca on threats, appeals to pity? Ad
 >  hominem?
 >   Ad
 populum? Trish Roberts on
 > 
 demagoguery. Trump as cult
 >   leader
 >
 >   b.   
 >
 >  Appel & others
 on burlesque, truthful
 >
 >  hyperbole, ridicule, satire, role of
 political
 >   cartoons?
 >
 >
 >  c.    
 >  
 Fishman on Trump’s
 >  boasts—e.g.
 I’m rich; I own
 >   them; they
 >  owe me.
 >
 >   7.   
 >   What
 can (or does) Burkean theory/criticism
 >   contribute? E.g., Dramatism,Perspetive
 by
 >  incongruity, 4
 >   master tropes?
 >  
 Hitler’s “battle”, paradox,
 >  
 dialectic?
 >
 >
 >  8.   
 >  
 What’s admirable about Trump?
 > 
 What’s the secret
 >   of his allure?
 His
 >  power to persuade? His
 distinctive
 >
 > 
 contribution? His
 >   successes with the
 white
 >  working class? With
 evangelicals?
 >   His
 >  tweets?
 >
 >   9.   
 >   The
 investigations of Trump & CO’s
 > 
 alleged
 >   wrongdoing?
 >
 >
 > 
 10.                     
 >   Impeachment debates; the obstruction
 of
 >  justice
 >  
 issue? Trump & Putin& other
 > 
 Russians; Trump &
 >   Flint.
 >
 >
 > 
 11.                     
 >   Hacking issue
 >
 >
 > 
 12.                     
 >   Subverting the Presidential election
 >
 >
 > 
 13.                     
 >   How will it all turn out?
 >   --
 >
 >   Herbert W. Simons,
 >
 >  Ph.D.
 >   Emeritus Professor of
 >  Communication
 >  
 Dep't of  Strategic
 > 
 Communication, Weiss Hall 215
 >  
 Temple
 >  University, Philadelphia
 19122
 >   Home phone:
 >  215 844 5969
 >   http://astro.temple.edu/~hsimons
 >   Academic Fellow, Center for
 Transformative
 >  Strategic
 >   Initiatives (CTSI)
 >
 >
 >
 >
 > 
 _______________________________________________
 >  KB mailing list
 > 
 KB at kbjournal.orghttp://kbjournal.org/mailman/listinfo/kb_kbjournal.org
 > 
 _______________________________________________
 >  KB mailing list
 > 
 KB at kbjournal.orghttp://kbjournal.org/mailman/listinfo/kb_kbjournal.org
 >
 >
 >
 _______________________________________________
 > KB mailing list
 > KB at kbjournal.org
 > http://kbjournal.org/mailman/listinfo/kb_kbjournal.org
 >
 



More information about the KB mailing list