[KB] Calling All Burkelers: 2015 RSA Summer Institute

David Blakesley david.blakesley at gmail.com
Sat Sep 13 16:52:54 EDT 2014


Just follow the link at the bottom to the RSA site, where you can find out
about registration, the site, dates, and all the rest . . .

Dave

On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 4:38 PM, Edward C Appel <edwardcappel at frontier.com>
wrote:

> Did I read this announcement about the RSA Summer Institute seminar on
> Burke's RM too superficially, or what?  Where will it be held?
>
> By the way, thanks, Professor Taylor, for your most interesting and
> relevant book chapter.  I'm reading it.
>
>
>
> Ed
> --------------------------------------------
> On Sat, 9/13/14, David Blakesley <david.blakesley at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>  Subject: [KB] Calling All Burkelers: 2015 RSA Summer Institute
>  To: "kb at kbjournal.org" <kb at kbjournal.org>
>  Date: Saturday, September 13, 2014, 3:28 PM
>
>  Posted on behalf of
>  Jack Selzer:
>  Calling All Burkelers
>
>  You, Your Students, and Your Colleagues Are
>  Invited
>  To the 2015 RSA Summer Institute Seminar on
>
>  “The War of
>  Words,” A Rhetoric of Motives, and Contemporary
>  Rhetorical Theory” led byJack
>  Selzer, Penn State UniversityKyle
>  Jensen, University of North TexasKrista Ratcliffe, Marquette
>  University Kenneth Burke’s A Rhetoric of
>  Motives has of course been recognized as a foundational
>  contribution to rhetorical theory ever since its appearance
>  in 1950. Because it expanded our collective sense of “the
>  realm of rhetoric” (so that we now understand science,
>  art, and materiality as falling within the domain of
>  rhetoric) and because it offered the concept of
>  “identification” as a complement to Aristotelian
>  categories of persuasion, A Rhetoric of
>  Motives remains the central text for everyone working
>  out the premises of “the new rhetoric.” And yet as
>  widely read as it is, RM remains imperfectly and
>  incompletely understood: the details of “identification”
>  remain as confounding as they are intriguing, and large
>  sections of RM remain confusing or elusive. Participants in this seminar,
> therefore,
>  will work together to comprehend RM and to tease
>  out its implications for the study of contemporary
>  discourse. Toward that end, participants will have a chance
>  to review and discuss a lengthy, intriguing, recently
>  discovered section of RM—called “The War of
>  Words”—that Burke decided to delete from his manuscript
>  at the last minute. Not only will the seminar leaders be
>  sharing the contents of “The War of Words” (an edition
>  of it is now in preparation) but they will also make
>  available other archival materials which bear on RM,
>  including correspondence between Burke and his colleagues
>  and friends J. S. Watson, Malcolm Cowley, and Stanley Edgar
>  Hyman (among others). Careful attention will also be given
>  over to an analysis of “identification” and the terms
>  associated with it in RM. But guiding
>  daily discussion will be participants’ own research and
>  individual questions. Participants will be encouraged to
>  submit short statements about their own questions and
>  scholarly interests (we seek a mix of graduate students,
>  junior faculty, and more senior scholars), and at least half
>  the time will be given over to participants’ developing
>  projects. If things go as planned, participants will leave
>  with a more mature understanding of RM as well as
>  invigorated individual work, whether it be an
>  article-in-progress, a dissertation or book chapter, or
>  whatever. Given the contents of RM and
>  “The War of Words,” we anticipate that the seminar will
>  interest, in addition to students of Kenneth Burke, scholars
>  working on post-World War II culture, publics theory,
>  national identity, rhetorical theory, rhetorics of the
>  popular press, and listening rhetorics. Join us!
>  Applications due
>  on October 1,
>  2014.
>
>  For information on how to
>  participate, go to the Rhetoric Society of America Web site,
>  or write Jack Selzer (jls25 at psu.edu)
>  “The War of Words,” A Rhetoric of
>  Motives, and Contemporary Rhetorical TheorySeminar leaders:Jack Selzer,
> Penn State University
>  Kyle Jensen, University of North Texas
>  Krista Ratcliffe, Marquette University
>  Kenneth Burke’s A Rhetoric
>  of Motives has of course been recognized as a
>  foundational contribution to rhetorical theory ever since
>  its appearance in 1950. Because it expanded our collective
>  sense of “the realm of rhetoric” (so that we now
>  understand science, art, and materiality as falling within
>  the domain of rhetoric) and because it offered the concept
>  of “identification” as a complement to Aristotelian
>  categories of persuasion, A Rhetoric of
>  Motives remains the central text for everyone working
>  out the premises of “the new rhetoric.” And yet as
>  widely read as it is, RM remains imperfectly and
>  incompletely understood: the details of “identification”
>  remain as confounding as they are intriguing, and large
>  sections of RM remain confusing or elusive.Participants in this seminar,
> therefore,
>  will work together to comprehend RM and to tease
>  out its implications for the study of contemporary
>  discourse. Toward that end, participants will have a chance
>  to review and discuss a lengthy, intriguing, recently
>  discovered section of RM—called “The War of
>  Words”—that Burke decided to delete from his manuscript
>  at the last minute. Not only will the seminar leaders be
>  sharing the contents of “The War of Words” (an edition
>  of it is now in preparation) but they will also make
>  available other archival materials which bear
>  on RM, including correspondence between Burke and
>  his colleagues and friends J. S. Watson, Malcolm Cowley, and
>  Stanley Edgar Hyman (among others). Careful attention will
>  also be given over to an analysis of “identification”
>  and the terms associated with it in RM.
>  But guiding daily discussion will
>  be participants’ own research and individual questions.
>  Participants will be encouraged to submit short statements
>  about their own questions and scholarly interests (we seek a
>  mix of graduate students, junior faculty, and more senior
>  scholars), and at least half the time will be given over to
>  participants’ developing projects. If things go as
>  planned, participants will leave with a more mature
>  understanding of RM as well as invigorated
>  individual work, whether it be an article-in-progress, a
>  dissertation or book chapter, or whatever.Given the contents of RM and
>  “The War of Words,” we anticipate that the seminar will
>  interest, in addition to students of Kenneth Burke, scholars
>  working on post-World War II culture, publics theory,
>  national identity, rhetorical theory, rhetorics of the
>  popular press, and listening rhetorics. Join us!
>  Questions should be directed to
>  Jack Selzer, jls25 at psu.edu
>  - See more at:
> http://associationdatabase.com/aws/RSA/pt/sd/news_article/89380/_blank/layout_details/false#sthash.ro7C6Pzd.dpuf
>
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>
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